Toads

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Killed by traffic. Many toads are killed by traffic while migrating to their breeding grounds. A study on wildlife that is killed on our region’s roads in Belgium has found that toads are the animal most frequently killed by traffic, (7,118). The rest of the top 10 is made up of the hedgehog, the fox, the blackbird, the brown frog, the squirrel, the polecat, the rabbit, the stone-martin and the wood pigeon.

In some places special tunnels have been constructed so that toads can cross under roads in safety. In my neighbourhood, local wildlife groups like Natuurpunt, run “toad patrols”, carrying the amphibians across roads at busy crossing points in buckets.

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54 responses

  1. We do a similar thing here in Concord, MA. We have an underground pass for wildlife, as well designated crossings and signs for salamanders and turtles. I think it’s great we ensure the safety of our (sadly) declining species, xo LMA

  2. I don’t know which animals are killed by traffic the most but here in Florida, USA, I rarely see an armadillo that is not dead. I believe nature made them almost invincible so they pay no attention to dangers around them, like cars that mother nature did not plan for.

  3. How fascinating (and wonderful) to have toad patrols. They have built special bridges here to help the deer cross the motorways (which were constructed in the middle of their territory). Sadly we still often see a hit deer on the motorway when driving.

  4. That’s so nice that they do that to protect them. I live in a small town with mountains all around us, with many white tail deer around. There are many accidents involving deer, cos they just run out of nowhere, and the deer don’t do well in those accidents. I have stopped (safely, of course) on many country roads to remove toads and also turtles that were on the road. Every little life that can be spared by our mechanical and busy lives is a good thing. They were here before our cars were.

  5. First I’ve heard of this but what a GREAT idea to help the toads when they need to get around. Here we have a lot of turtles certain times of the year but also squirrels, skunks and deer.

    Pam

  6. In my neighborhood, it is the opossums whose carcasses are on the road in the morning. They come out and get struck by autos at night crossing the road. No one puts a sign up for them.

  7. I hate to see poor creatures killed by traffic. I even stopped to move a snake across the road once, but where I live it is usually turtles I’m rescuing. I like toads, they are very helpful in the garden, and I also am very glad to see you have people helping them.

  8. Good for the patrols 🙂 we have a lot of Kangaroos here that end up killed on roads..so very sad..and people have died trying to avoid them then crashing their cars.echidnas and wombats also fall victim…when we have heavy rain the roads are covered in tiny little frogs..they are so hard to see…I hate animals coming to grief..when a roo is hot here it’s pouch is checked and then the dead roo sprayed with paint…this way others know the ouch has been checked and nothing more can be done..I will not drive at sunrise or sunset due to the roos..it really worries me 😦 hugs Fozziemum x

    • Wow, that’s a more dangerous situation where you live, Fozziemum. Not only for the animals but also for the humans…

      • The poor roos…breaks my heart..we do have these funny little things you put on your car underneath and they make a sound that warms the roos you are coming..but they are so fast,.so very fast,,and before you know it they are there..and with the wombats they blend in with the colour of the bitumen and often cannot be seen til the last minute..i have managed to save a few echidnas thankfully ..one saldy did not survive their injuries..but they are quite an hard one..if they are on the bitumen and you go to move them they try and burrow..damaging their ‘beaks’..and as for moving them from ground! well grown men struggle to get them moved once they start to dig in..they are one of the strongest little critters I have ever come across!..we move them from fencelines here and we have to dig a huge hole aroiund them and carefull use a crowbar! google them one day they really are amazing! 🙂

        • The echidnas looks a bit like the European hedgehogs. The hedgehog is also one of the most frequently killed animals by traffic in our region.
          It’s a very hard and dangerous world out there, Fozziemum… 😦

  9. Oh no, it’s just the worst to see something on the road. Luckily, I’ve never hit anything but then again, I don’t drive at night at all or very fast on the highway. I wish I lived in your neighbourhood, I’d be out rescue toads right along with the others, poor little things. I’m so glad your dad built you a nice safe garden to snoop around in and we don’t have to worry about you on the road Mr Bowie.

  10. We have been known to leap from the car to move slow moving critters like turtles and yes, toads…I HATE it when poor critters meet death by vehicle. I even have a prayer for animals ready in case of fatalities…

  11. It is heart warming to read about organisations like Natuurpunt lending a helping hand to the small creatures. I read their article “Paddenoverzet” after visiting your blog – very interesting.

    • Welcome on HoB! Thank you so much for following the blog.
      Glad you liked the post and that you read the Natuurpunt article. Much appreciated!

  12. There are several organizations in my area (outside Philadelphia PA, USA) that sponsor Amphibian Crossing events at the time of year when they are most mobile, and along the roads they are most likely to try to cross. Toads are the most common, but there are a variety of salamanders, etc., that also need an escort. It’s great to see people turn out for things like this.

    • Hi Akire! Welcome on HoB. Thank you for following the blog. Much appreciated!
      It makes me feel good to see that people all over the world care about these little animals.

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